Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Nurture the Earth by Composting


About one third of the space in landfills is taken up with waste from our yards and kitchens, just the type of material that can be used in compost. With a small investment in time, you can contribute to the solution to a community problem, while at the same time enriching the soil and improving the health of the plants on your property.

Metro Nashville's Omohundro Center now offers compost bins from Earth Machines.
Retailing at $85, they are offering them for $40. Now is as good a time as any to learn how to compost. For more info about composting, read here or here.

The Omohundro Center also takes residential trash, furniture, furniture, mattresses, tires, etc. plus all the regular recyclables. Happy Composting! >carrie.

2 comments:

DB Carden said...

I have a couple old trash cans that will do the trick too if modified slightly if anyone is interested.

Carrie, The Modern Housewife said...

FYI. Just recieved this info:

MASTER COMPOSTER CLASS REGISTRATION IS OPEN!

Metro Beautification & Environment Commission, a division of Metro Public Works is offering the Master Composter Class this fall! The cost is $35, which covers the cost of the class materials.

Class meets on six THURSDAY evenings: 5:30 – 7:30 pm, September 6, 13, 20, 27; October 4, 11

Note: Attendance at 5 of the 6 classes is required to receive the Master Composter Certificate.

Registration is limited to 20 people!

To register for this class:
1. Reply to this email and include your full name
2. We will email to you a registration form
3. Mail in the registration form and payment to complete your registration
4. We will email a confirmation of completed registration and an agenda of class topics

More about the class: Beginning and experienced composters, gardeners and those interested in conserving natural resources, reducing household waste and improving the soil will enjoy this informative certification class.

Why become a Master Composter? Composting is an important part of gardening and backyard conservation, but that’s not all. Approximately 28 percent of residential waste is organic material and all of this waste can be diverted from the waste stream. With backyard composting, Americans can save millions of dollars a year.

The Master Composter Class covers home composting methods, soil and composting science, household hazardous waste reduction through composting, and organic gardening and odd composting from around the world.

For more information, contact Julie Berbiglia at Julie.berbiglia@nashville.gov or call 880-2419.